The Human Truth Foundation

Countries With the Healthiest Cultures and Health Policies

By Vexen Crabtree 2020

#china #czechia #disease #health #hungary #ireland #italy #mongolia #netherlands #niue #uzbekistan

The countries with the best overall approach to public health, in terms of both public policy and individual lifestyle choices, are Hong Kong, Singapore and The Maldives. These countries are worth emulating. And, although often through no fault of the average citizen, the worst countries are S. Sudan, Nigeria and Equatorial Guinea.

The data sets used to calculate points for each country are its average life expectancy, its alcohol consumption rate, its fertility rate, its smoking rate, its suicide rate, its food aid and health contributions and WHO compliance, the prevalence of overweight adults, its adolescent birth rate and its immunizations take-up. The regions with the best average results per country are Scandinavia, Asia and Europe, whereas the worst are Africa, Micronesia and Polynesia.


1. The Criteria: Health

Health

Overall Results:
Best: Hong Kong, Singapore, Maldives
Regions: Scandinavia, Asia and Europe
Worst: S. Sudan, Nigeria, Equatorial Guinea
Regions: Africa, Micronesia and Polynesia
Constituent Data Sets: Health
1. Life ExpectancyBest: Hong Kong, Japan, Italy
Worst: Swaziland, Lesotho, Sierra Leone
2. Alcohol ConsumptionBest: 5-country draw
Worst: Moldova, Lithuania, Czechia
3. Fertility RateBest: Hong Kong, Bosnia & Herzegovina, Malta
Worst: Niger, Somalia, Zambia
4. Smoking RatesBest: Guinea, Solomon Islands, Kiribati
Worst: Montenegro, Belarus, Lebanon
5. Suicide RateBest: Grenada, Haiti, Egypt
Worst: Lithuania, Russia, S. Korea
6. Food Aid, Health Contributions & WHO ComplianceBest: Sweden, Ireland, Denmark
Worst: Angola, St Vincent & Grenadines, Mauritania
7. Overweight AdultsBest: Vietnam, India, Bangladesh
Worst: Nauru, Palau, Cook Islands
Constituent Data Sets: Children's Health
8. Adolescent Birth RateBest: N. Korea, S. Korea, Switzerland
Worst: Niger, Mali, Angola
9. Infant Immunizations 2011-2015Best: China, Hungary, Uzbekistan
Worst: Equatorial Guinea, S. Sudan, Somalia

1.1. Life Expectancy

#demographics #health #hong_kong #immigration #japan #life_expectancy #longevity #population

Life Expectancy (2015)1
Pos.Higher is better
Years1
1Hong Kong84.16
2Japan83.68
3Italy83.34
4Singapore83.21
5Switzerland83.13
6Spain82.77
7Iceland82.72
8Israel82.56
9Australia82.54
10France82.36
11Sweden82.35
12Canada82.22
13S. Korea82.13
14New Zealand82.03
15Chile81.96
16Luxembourg81.88
17Norway81.71
18Netherlands81.71
19Austria81.58
20Andorra81.46
q=190.
Life Expectancy (2015)1
Pos.Lower is worse
Years1
190Swaziland48.94
189Lesotho50.08
188Sierra Leone51.32
187Central African Rep.51.46
186Ivory Coast51.89
185Chad51.90
184Angola52.70
183Nigeria53.06
182Mozambique55.48
181Guinea-Bissau55.49
180Somalia55.71
179Cameroon55.96
178S. Sudan56.13
177Burundi57.12
176S. Africa57.66
175Equatorial Guinea57.91
174Mali58.47
173Burkina Faso59.01
172Congo, DR59.06
171Zimbabwe59.20
q=190.

Global life expectancy has risen above the 70s, reaching 72, by 20162, as part of a global trend towards better health2,3, and due to huge portions of the world being gradually lifted out of poverty. It also reflects overall improvements to cultural health, including diet, health services systems, attitudes to exercise and well-being, and also family structure and caring. For decades, Japan was well-known for having the highest average life expectancy4, until the top spot was taken by Hong Kong. The regions with the best life expectancy are Europe (78.36), The Middle East (75.03) and North America (74.94)1 and the worst, by some way, is Africa (61.59)1.

One effect of rising longevity is the 'demographics crisis'; where an increasing portion of the population is old and retired, putting pressure on services and taxes5. The solution is for aging countries to import younger workers from elsewhere; over time, as birth rates stabilize, geriatric care improves the length of the working life, and population growth calms, this situation will stabilize.

The United Nations Human Development Report contains data on the Life Expectancy at Birth. Life expectancy stats are sometimes skewed by taking into account immigration, so that much of the time stats are compiled of natural-born inhabitants only.

1.2. Alcohol Consumption

#alcohol #health #sociology

Alcohol Consumption (2016)6
Pos.Lower is better
Per Capita6
1Bangladesh0.0
2Kuwait0.0
3Libya0.0
4Mauritania0.0
5Somalia0.0
6Yemen0.1
7Afghanistan0.2
8Saudi Arabia0.2
9Syria0.3
10Pakistan0.3
11Kiribati0.4
12Iraq0.4
13Brunei0.4
14Egypt0.4
15Djibouti0.5
16Niger0.5
17Sudan0.5
18Bhutan0.6
19Morocco0.6
20Jordan0.7
q=189.
Alcohol Consumption (2016)6
Pos.Higher is worse
Per Capita6
189Moldova15.2
188Lithuania15.0
187Czechia14.4
186Nigeria13.4
185Germany13.4
184Luxembourg13.0
183Ireland13.0
182Latvia12.9
181Romania12.7
180Bulgaria12.7
179Slovenia12.6
178France12.6
177Portugal12.3
176Belgium12.1
175Seychelles12.0
174Russia11.7
173Austria11.6
172Poland11.6
171Estonia11.6
170UK11.5
q=189.

There is nothing wrong with drinking modest and sensible amounts of alcohol but fitness, physical health, mental health and long-term health all suffer as a result of medium- or heavy- drinking7 and the health risks to the baby when pregnant mothers drink8 are well-known. Aside from the effects on the individual, alcohol misuse impacts on entire economies9 via increased health service costs, policing costs and lost days' work. Worldwide, alcohol misuse is "among the top five risk factors for disease, disability and death" and is a "cause of more than 200 disease and injury conditions in individuals, most notably alcohol dependence, liver cirrhosis, cancers and injuries"10. "In 2012... 5.9% of all global deaths, were attributable to alcohol consumption"11. Deaths from chronic alcohol misuse have been rising for decades, and so has violence, abuse, vandalism and crime all associated with alcohol over-use. The aggression and crime associated with alcohol in some Western countries infringes on the human rights of those who want nothing to do with such behaviour. Many of the social effects of alcohol are psychological and cultural; i.e., people don't have to behave criminally or destructively whilst drunk - it is a culturally learned behaviour. Experiments have shown that behaviour can be controlled: Those who do not wish to behave badly whilst drunk, will not do so.

1.3. Fertility Rate

#birth_control #demographics #health #overpopulation

Fertility Rate (2013)12
Pos.2.0 is best12
1N. Korea2.00
2Brunei1.99
3St Vincent & Grenadines2.01
4France1.99
5Turkey2.04
6Australia1.96
7Uruguay2.05
8Norway1.95
9Myanmar (Burma)1.95
10Indonesia2.07
11Sweden1.93
12Tunisia1.93
13St Lucia1.93
14USA2.08
15Ireland2.10
16Iceland2.10
17Denmark1.88
18Bahamas1.88
19Finland1.87
20UK1.87
q=180.
Fertility Rate (2013)12
Pos.2.0 is best12
180Niger6.96
179Somalia6.30
178Zambia6.30
177Mali6.16
176Afghanistan6.03
175Timor-Leste (E. Timor)5.99
174Malawi5.98
173Uganda5.95
172Chad5.79
171Burkina Faso5.77
170Congo, DR5.54
169Tanzania5.51
168Nigeria5.45
167Rwanda5.30
166Angola5.19
165Benin5.12
164Liberia5.08
163Guinea5.08
162Equatorial Guinea5.02
161Yemen4.98
q=180.

The fertility rate is, in simple terms, the average amount of children that each woman has. The higher the figure, the quicker the population is growing, although, to calculate the rate you also need to take into account morbidity, i.e., the rate at which people die. If people live healthy and long lives and morbidity is low, then, 2.0 approximates to the replacement rate, which would keep the population stable. If all countries had such a fertility rate, population growth would end. The actual replacement rate in most developed countries is around 2.1.

In order to calculate the points for each country, I had to pick an optimum fertility rate, and then detract points as countries strayed from it. I have opted for the round figure of 2.0, slightly lower than the replacement rate, because the population right now is too high, therefore, the best fertility rate is probably one that will see a gradual decline in population numbers, at least for a few hundred years. The decline cannot be fast however, as this tends to create severe economic problems. So, any country that is either below 2.0 or above 2.0 loses points.

1.4. Smoking Rates

#cancer #democracy #health #smoking

Smoking Rates (2014)13
Pos.Higher is worse13
182Montenegro4 125
181Belarus3 831
180Lebanon3 023
179Macedonia2 732
178Russia2 690
177Slovenia2 637
176Belgium2 353
175Luxembourg2 284
174China2 250
173Bosnia & Herzegovina2 233
172Czechia2 194
171Kazakhstan2 157
170Azerbaijan2 114
169Greece2 086
168S. Korea2 073
167Austria1 988
166Jordan1 855
165Ukraine1 854
164Estonia1 775
163Hungary1 759
q=182.
Smoking Rates (2014)13
Pos.Lower is better13
1Guinea 15
2Solomon Islands 26
3Kiribati 28
4Uganda 41
5Rwanda 53
6Samoa 54
7Congo, DR 74
8Ethiopia 76
9Vanuatu 76
10Guyana 77
11Suriname 79
12Malawi 80
13Tonga 81
14Mozambique 82
15Nepal 83
16Afghanistan 84
17Lesotho 88
18Trinidad & Tobago 97
19Burundi 98
20Tanzania 101
q=182.

Cigarettes are the most lethal consumer product on the planet and is the biggest preventable course of disease in the world14. The fight for public health means limiting and reducing the business of the tobacco industry and as the governments of most developed countries make headway, the tobacco industry has resisted with misinformation, public-relations campaigns and fake customer-concern lobby groups, trying to make the government think that the citizens do not support its actions. With £30 billion pounds (UKP) profit per year14, the industry runs such massive and influential lobbies that most governments find it difficult to make any progress in curbing rates of smoking.

If you smoke, you are more likely to drink. If you smoke or drink, you are also more likely to do drugs. Smoking is statistically intertwined deeply with trash culture. Only 15% of men in the highest professional classes smoke, but 42% of unskilled workers do15. Smoking is higher amongst those who are already in trouble: single mothers smoke at 55%, most homeless do and practically 100% of drug addicts do15. Smoking during late pregnancy reduces the IQ of babies by an average of 6.2 points16 and causes increased antisocial behaviour. Aside from the financial cost to taxpayers and the health costs to individuals, indirect negative economic effects result from increased rates of disease and sick days lost from work.

1.5. Suicide Rate

#belgium #finland #health #japan #mental_health #suicide #switzerland

Suicide Rate (2013)17
Pos.
Per 100k17
1Haiti0
2Grenada0
3Egypt0.1
4Jordan0.2
5Maldives0.7
6Azerbaijan1.3
7S. Africa1.8
8Bahamas2.5
9Peru2.9
10Kuwait3.6
11Armenia3.9
12Dominican Rep.4.6
13St Lucia4.9
14Tajikistan5.2
15Venezuela6.5
16Malta6.9
17Greece7
18Paraguay7.1
19St Vincent & Grenadines7.3
20Guatemala7.3
q=91.
Suicide Rate (2013)17
Pos.
Per 100k17
91Lithuania71.7
90Russia63.4
89S. Korea62
88Belarus57.5
87Kazakhstan52.4
86Guyana52.4
85Hungary50.6
84Japan49.4
83Latvia48.2
82Ukraine44.8
81Slovenia44
80Belgium39.1
79Finland39
78Serbia38.1
77Estonia37.9
76Croatia36.4
75Switzerland36.2
74Moldova35.7
73France33.2
72Uruguay32.3
q=91.

Suicide as a human behaviour is recorded in the texts of the most ancient civilisations. But reliable statistics on it are hard to collect. The World Health Organisation publishes the statistics used by the United Nations, which is duplicated in the long table on the right.

Almost universally, successful male suicide rates are much higher than female rates. However, female suicide attempts are more frequent than male attempts.

Countries with high suicide rates are a mixture between those riddled with organized criminal gangs, under-developed countries, and, highly developed countries. There are cultural and situational effects at work that persist in the long-term: nothing seems to lower the high suicide rates in Japan, Belgium and Finland. And some of the countries with the lowest rates are not particularly well developed socially. It seems there is no correlation between suicide rates and things like development, prosperity and national engagement in human rights.

Switzerland comes in as the country with the 17th highest suicide rate despite its liberal stance, with 36.2 suicides per 100,000 people.

The Social and Moral Development Index does not grant any points on the basis of suicide rates. There is an element of human freedom and dignity involved which means that it is wrong to class suicides as absolutely bad: it may be the case that the countries with the highest suicide rates are also those where people are able to legally end their own lives (for example in the case of serious degenerative disease). It would be destructive to give these countries a "worse" score than those where suicide is hidden or illegal. Hence, the data here is informational only.

1.6. Food Aid, Health Contributions & WHO Compliance

Food Aid, Health Contributions & WHO Compliance (2017)18
Pos.Lower is better
Rank18
1Sweden1
2Ireland2
3Denmark3
4UK4
5Norway5
6Switzerland6
7Germany7
8Canada8
9Netherlands9
10USA10
11Luxembourg11
12Finland12
13Australia13
14UAE14
15Saudi Arabia15
16Belgium16
17New Zealand17
18Jordan18
19S. Korea19
20Kuwait20
q=163.
Food Aid, Health Contributions & WHO Compliance (2017)18
Pos.Higher is worse
Rank18
163Angola163
162St Vincent & Grenadines162
161Mauritania161
160Senegal160
159Algeria159
158Belize158
157Papua New Guinea157
156Libya156
155Bahamas155
154Cape Verde154
153Mozambique153
152Trinidad & Tobago152
151St Lucia151
150Nigeria150
149Tonga149
148Togo148
147Jamaica147
146Samoa146
145Botswana145
144Marshall Islands144
q=163.

The Good Country Index's criteria on Contributions to Health and Wellbeing include the following:

  1. Food aid: Food aid funding (according to WFP) relative to the size of the economy.

  2. Pharmaceutical exports: Exports of pharmaceuticals (according to ITC) relative to the size of the economy.

  3. Voluntary excess donations to the WHO: Voluntary excess contributions to World Health Organisation relative to the size of the economy.

  4. Humanitarian aid donations: Humanitarian aid contributions (according to UNOCHA) relative to the size of the economy.

  5. International Health Regulations Compliance: International Health Regulations Compliance (according to WHO).

1.7. Overweight Adults

#genetics #health #obesity #public_health #UK

Overweight Adults (2016)19
Pos.Lower is better
%19
1Vietnam18.3
2India19.7
3Bangladesh20.0
4Ethiopia20.9
5Nepal21.0
6Timor-Leste (E. Timor)21.6
7Cambodia21.7
8Niger22.0
9Eritrea22.0
10Burundi22.2
11Uganda22.4
12Afghanistan23.0
13Chad23.1
14Burkina Faso23.2
15Sri Lanka23.3
16Malawi23.4
17Madagascar23.9
18Myanmar (Burma)24.8
19Rwanda25.1
20Congo, DR25.3
q=191.
Overweight Adults (2016)19
Pos.Higher is worse
%19
191Nauru88.5
190Palau85.1
189Cook Islands84.7
188Marshall Islands83.5
187Tuvalu81.9
186Niue80.0
185Kiribati78.7
184Tonga78.5
183Samoa77.6
182Micronesia75.9
181Kuwait73.4
180Qatar71.7
179Saudi Arabia69.7
178Jordan69.6
177USA67.9
176Lebanon67.9
175UAE67.8
174Turkey66.8
173Libya66.8
172Malta66.4
q=191.

About one third of the global population is overweight or obese20. Most Western countries are facing an obesity epidemic. Our cultures are having to change to compensate for widespread ill-health. It is costing our health systems a massive amount of money, and is having negative effects on national economies. The situation has persisted for a suitable length of time for our very perceptions to change; opinions on "normal weights" for people and "average sizes" for clothes has shot up21. Over 2 in 3 adults in the UK are overweight21 and this costs the NHS £5.1 billion per year22 and "costs Britain's economy £47bn a year; more than war, terrorism or armed violence"23. We are forgetting how to be healthy.

The causes are not genetic. Most people who say obesity "runs in their family" are wrong. The rate of increase in obesity is many, many times too fast to be accounted for by a change in inherited genes24. Our culture and lifestyle choices are to blame. The causes of the modern obesity epidemic are processed foods, low levels of physical exercise, over-indulgence, poor choices in food products, poor knowledge of nutrition. Most of this is made much worse by well-funded advertising campaigns by food manufacturers selling cheaper mass-produced food. Even some so-called "health foods" contain well over recommended limits of fat, salt and sugar25.

1.8. Adolescent Birth Rate

#health #parenting #population

Adolescent Birth Rate (2015)26
Pos.Lower is better
Per 100026
1N. Korea0.5
2S. Korea1.6
3Switzerland2.9
4Hong Kong3.2
5Slovenia3.8
6Singapore3.8
7Netherlands4.0
8Denmark4.0
9Japan4.1
10Cyprus5.0
11Sweden5.7
12Norway5.9
13Luxembourg5.9
14Italy6.0
15Iceland6.1
16Libya6.2
17Finland6.5
18Germany6.7
19Maldives6.7
20Tunisia6.8
q=185.
Adolescent Birth Rate (2015)26
Pos.Higher is worse
Per 100026
185Niger202.4
184Mali174.6
183Angola164.3
182Guinea140.6
181Mozambique139.7
180Malawi136.2
179Ivory Coast135.5
178Chad133.5
177Congo, DR122.6
176Tanzania118.6
175Sierra Leone118.2
174Congo, (Brazzaville)117.7
173Madagascar116.2
172Gambia113.0
171Uganda111.9
170Nigeria110.6
169Zimbabwe109.7
168Liberia108.8
167Equatorial Guinea108.7
166Burkina Faso108.5
q=185.

In a world with over 7.5 billion people on it (almost doubling in the author's generation alone), quality is more important than quantity. Education and wisdom take time to develop, and teenage pregnancies are recognized by most governments as a cause of deprivation and a health concern. The statistics given here from the "Human Development Report" by United Nations (2017)27 show the birth rate in women aged 15-19. Unfortunately, although children of a younger age also go through pregnancy, statistics are not widely available.

1.9. Infant Immunizations 2011-2015

#health #vaccines

Infant Immunizations 2011-2015 (2015)28
Pos.Higher is better
Avg %28
1Hungary99.0
2China99.0
3Uzbekistan98.9
4Niue98.8
5Mongolia98.7
6Czechia98.7
7Seychelles98.6
8S. Korea98.6
9Sri Lanka98.4
10St Lucia98.2
11Bahrain98.2
12Iran98.1
13Finland98.1
14Saudi Arabia98.0
15Luxembourg98.0
16Oman98.0
17Antigua & Barbuda98.0
18Cuba97.9
19Belgium97.8
20Thailand97.8
q=194.
Infant Immunizations 2011-2015 (2015)28
Pos.Lower is worse
Avg %28
194Equatorial Guinea36.8
193S. Sudan45.7
192Somalia46.0
191Central African Rep.49.4
190Nigeria50.0
189Chad52.5
188Ukraine55.2
187Syria62.4
186Guinea63.3
185Vanuatu65.5
184Haiti65.7
183Papua New Guinea66.3
182Yemen67.4
181Samoa68.1
180Niger69.7
179Afghanistan70.6
178Iraq70.7
177Madagascar71.9
176Angola71.9
175S. Africa72.5
q=194.

Immunization to many diseases can be obtained through vaccination. By comparing international statistics on seven easily preventable diseases, it is easily seen that good policies on national health is not simply the preserve of the rich: the best countries at immunizing infants are Hungary, China, Uzbekistan, Niue, Mongolia and the Czech Republic29. The seven diseases are: diphtheria, haemophilus influenza type b (hib), hepatitis B, measles pertussis (whooping cough), polio, tetanus (and neonatal tetanus) and tuberculosis (TB), and all of them are serious and can result in suffering, lasting harm, permanent disabilities, and often death, if not treated properly. Where mass immunizations are effected, incidences of these diseases can fall by up to 90%, and in many cases immunizations have completely eradicated national occurences of certain diseases.

Unfortunately, the Western world is suffering from an era of mass-media-led misinformation when it comes to some vaccines and immunizations30. UK sensationalist newspapers in the 1990s made claims about associations between some vaccines and autism (with no evidence to support it) leading to a rapid drop in acceptance of vaccines. Measles and mumps rates shot up by thousands of times. Epidemics between 2005 and 201331 saw total numbers approaching 10,000 cases, starting off with "prolonged outbreaks in travelling and religious communities, where vaccine uptake has been historically low"32. Similar trends in the Netherlands in 1999 meant 2,300 cases emerged in a specific community that is "philosophically opposed to vaccination", resulting in deaths33. Ireland saw a surge to 1500 cases in the year 2000 including three deaths34, and Italy suffered three deaths too33. For developed countries to see these preventable diseases' numbers rise in this way is embarrassing, and indicates a loss of cultural wisdom.

For more detail on immunizations and the statistics used for this data, see the full page: "Immunizations: International Statistics on Vaccines and the Autism Scare" by Vexen Crabtree (2017).

2. Overall Results by Country

#health #human_development

The overall scores are simply an average of each countries' position in all of the data sets that make up this category. Countries only receive a ranking if they have at least 4 different data points across the data sets. The overall results for each country are listed alongside their position in the Social and Moral Development Index.

Pos.Health (2020)
Lower is better

Avg Rank35
Social & Moral
Lower is better

Avg Rank36,37
1Hong Kong18.0
2Singapore41.554.2
3Maldives43.374.4
4Japan50.939.8
5S. Korea52.045.0
6Sri Lanka55.077.7
7Oman57.989.1
8Bhutan58.683.7
9Brunei59.396.0
10Norway62.030.9
11China62.478.3
12Malaysia64.173.2
13Mauritius64.566.5
14Switzerland65.637.2
15Finland65.932.0
16Italy66.445.1
17Bangladesh68.599.3
18Spain69.142.2
19N. Korea69.6117.1
20Thailand70.478.5
21Qatar71.180.4
22Uzbekistan71.185.6
23Portugal71.550.7
24Kuwait72.385.2
25Luxembourg72.939.5
26Germany73.334.3
27Saudi Arabia73.488.6
28Austria73.935.6
29Iran74.497.8
30Denmark74.930.5
31Morocco75.182.9
32Sweden75.633.3
33Armenia76.076.1
34Iceland76.039.6
35Greece76.162.6
36Netherlands76.435.5
37Cuba76.476.2
38UAE76.677.9
39Antigua & Barbuda77.793.5
40Myanmar (Burma)78.3113.2
41Belgium78.443.5
42Eritrea78.4124.4
43Nepal78.691.9
44Bahrain79.090.2
45India79.187.2
46Cyprus79.355.6
47Slovenia79.847.2
48Tunisia80.076.9
49Slovakia80.157.0
50Israel80.867.5
q=187.
Pos.Health (2020)
Lower is better

Avg Rank35
Social & Moral
Lower is better

Avg Rank36,37
51UK80.939.8
52Hungary81.048.0
53Brazil81.066.9
54Macedonia81.576.4
55Malta81.656.6
56Poland82.552.8
57Albania82.871.4
58Croatia82.961.7
59France82.944.0
60Vietnam83.079.0
61Czechia83.049.0
62Canada83.136.8
63Bosnia & Herzegovina83.173.5
64St Lucia84.491.9
65Solomon Islands84.7121.6
66Turkmenistan85.199.5
67Australia85.341.1
68Estonia85.351.1
69Turkey85.677.4
70Tajikistan86.491.9
71Guyana86.596.2
72Nicaragua86.887.9
73Barbados87.174.5
74Bahamas87.589.3
75Jordan87.580.6
76Kiribati87.7116.2
77Ireland87.842.9
78Fiji88.088.7
79Ecuador88.077.4
80Pakistan88.1111.4
81New Zealand88.337.6
82Burundi88.5120.9
83El Salvador89.186.3
84Dominica89.294.7
85St Kitts & Nevis89.396.1
86Algeria89.597.2
87Kyrgyzstan90.084.2
88Grenada90.595.8
89Trinidad & Tobago90.676.4
90USA91.156.2
91Sudan91.7118.2
92Libya91.9106.5
93Costa Rica91.956.0
94Lebanon92.389.6
95Georgia92.477.7
96Rwanda92.4101.5
97Mongolia92.573.5
98Ethiopia92.9111.2
99Latvia93.861.1
100Mexico93.872.3
q=187.
Pos.Health (2020)
Lower is better

Avg Rank35
Social & Moral
Lower is better

Avg Rank36,37
101St Vincent & Grenadines93.995.0
102Sao Tome & Principe94.0110.8
103Cambodia94.0108.6
104Russia94.581.1
105Peru94.674.4
106Andorra94.892.3
107Lithuania94.864.4
108Djibouti94.9111.0
109Indonesia94.992.4
110Vanuatu95.7103.5
111Paraguay96.389.4
112Seychelles96.379.5
113Panama96.576.9
114Chile96.558.6
115Kazakhstan97.986.2
116Honduras98.397.9
117Azerbaijan98.487.6
118Moldova98.673.2
119Serbia99.168.5
120Suriname99.397.2
121Bolivia100.082.1
122Jamaica100.383.1
123Cape Verde100.397.1
124Colombia100.682.8
125Egypt100.692.6
126Guatemala100.685.2
127Comoros101.3119.3
128Gambia101.3111.4
129Uruguay102.156.8
130Guinea102.3110.2
131Ghana102.690.1
132Montenegro102.977.4
133Malawi103.3109.0
134Botswana103.4101.4
135Afghanistan103.5128.1
136Tonga103.6110.8
137Bulgaria104.066.7
138Syria104.9117.2
139Romania105.161.6
140Timor-Leste (E. Timor)105.3107.5
141Lesotho105.8104.3
142Kenya106.494.5
143Senegal107.594.7
144Zimbabwe107.6117.1
145Mauritania107.8119.3
146Belize107.991.7
147Tanzania107.9104.4
148Samoa108.3102.7
149Ukraine108.675.2
150Zambia108.8100.3
q=187.
Pos.Health (2020)
Lower is better

Avg Rank35
Social & Moral
Lower is better

Avg Rank36,37
151Belarus109.477.4
152Dominican Rep.109.885.5
153Benin109.9110.9
154Madagascar110.3110.5
155Haiti110.8112.9
156Yemen111.4122.6
157Congo, DR111.5124.8
158Somalia111.7143.7
159Niger111.9117.1
160Sierra Leone112.1111.6
161Liberia112.3115.9
162Togo113.3108.1
163Philippines113.579.5
164Mozambique114.0113.4
165Uganda114.199.3
166Argentina114.368.1
167Central African Rep.114.9128.3
168S. Africa114.979.0
169Venezuela115.199.4
170Laos116.4107.0
171Guinea-Bissau116.5123.7
172Burkina Faso117.097.9
173Micronesia117.2125.3
174Cameroon118.0111.3
175Chad118.6127.0
176Swaziland120.0117.6
177Mali120.6110.1
178Namibia121.1100.8
179Papua New Guinea122.0121.0
180Congo, (Brazzaville)123.1122.2
181Gabon131.4110.9
182Iraq132.0124.2
183Ivory Coast132.4110.8
184Angola135.0128.9
185Equatorial Guinea136.4128.1
186Nigeria140.8111.6
187S. Sudan143.3133.4
q=187.

3. Overall Results by Region

#alcohol #birth_control #demographics #health #human_development #life_expectancy #longevity #mental_health #obesity #overpopulation #parenting #population #smoking #suicide #vaccines

AreaHealth (2020)
Lower is better

Avg Rank35
Social & Moral
Lower is better

Avg Rank36,37
Africa...107.8108.7
Asia...79.886.5
Australasia98.1104.9
Baltic States91.358.9
Central America95.983.1
Europe...83.558.0
Melanesia97.6108.7
Micronesia102.4121.5
North America92.483.1
Polynesia100.096.3
Scandinavia...73.336.2
Small Islands...88.494.3
South America97.979.1
The Americas...94.381.8
The Balkans89.971.2
The Caribbean...91.389.6
The Mediterranean84.472.2
The Middle East86.289.8
World92.386.4

The table here shows overall results for this category, compared with each region's average score on the Social and Moral Development Index. Regional values are calculated as an average of national results, not by total regional population. The tables below show results for each data set for each region.

Health Data Sets by Region:

AreaLife
Expectancy (2015)
Higher is better

Years1
Alcohol Consumption (2016)
Lower is better

Per Capita6
Fertility Rate (2013)
2.0 is best
12
Smoking Rates (2014)
Lower is better
13
Suicide Rate (2013)
Per 100k17
Food Aid, Health Contributions & WHO Compliance (2017)
Lower is better

Rank18
Overweight Adults (2016)
Lower is better
%19
Africa...61.594.84.31 3406.13117.033.3
Asia...73.183.92.461 03519.5064.444.3
Australasia72.074.33.26 37220.0094.673.3
Baltic States74.9513.21.561 31352.6053.757.7
Central America74.475.02.65 35810.9576.157.9
Europe...78.3610.31.611 64826.9947.458.5
Melanesia68.281.73.57 38796.557.2
Micronesia69.463.03.33 28144.082.3
North America74.946.92.26 44310.6696.757.0
Polynesia76.235.73.24 27223.60104.078.1
Scandinavia...80.879.81.911 02928.9314.857.2
Small Islands...73.345.32.65 4197.71115.057.4
South America74.136.92.33 48118.3390.158.3
The Americas...74.666.92.29 45713.5794.357.4
The Balkans76.719.21.472 21518.3284.158.5
The Caribbean...74.147.52.06 3858.09130.454.5
The Mediterranean77.505.71.991 64416.4876.261.4
The Middle East74.921.92.681 2184.8360.164.9
World71.276.22.81 81920.9382.049.0

Children's Health Data Sets by Region:

AreaAdolescent Birth Rate (2015)
Lower is better

Per 100026
Infant Immunizations 2011-2015 (2015)
Higher is better

Avg %28
Africa...87.581.7
Asia...29.990.5
Australasia30.186.4
Baltic States12.693.5
Central America71.090.3
Europe...14.692.7
Melanesia47.881.0
Micronesia16.186.7
North America53.291.5
Polynesia21.288.7
Scandinavia...6.991.3
Small Islands...38.490.7
South America62.690.9
The Americas...56.691.3
The Balkans17.893.5
The Caribbean...47.792.5
The Mediterranean17.392.6
The Middle East28.389.7
World47.988.3

4. The Social and Moral Development Index

The data sets form part of the calculations for the Human Truth Foundation's Social and Moral Development Index.

The Social and Moral Development Index concentrates on moral issues and human rights, violence, public health, equality, tolerance, freedom and effectiveness in climate change mitigation and environmentalism, and on some technological issues. A country scores higher for achieving well in those areas, and for sustaining that achievement in the long term. Those countries towards the top of this index can truly said to be setting good examples and leading humankind onwards into a bright, humane, and free future. See: Which are the Best Countries in the World? The Social and Moral Development Index.