The Human Truth Foundation

Jordan (Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan)

By Vexen Crabtree 2013

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Jordan
Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan
StatusIndependent State
Social and Moral Index111st best
CapitalAmman
Land Area1 88 780 km2
LocationAsia, Middle East
Population26.457 million
Life Expectancy373.54yrs (2012)
GNI3$5 272
ISO3166-1 Codes4JO, JOR, 400
Internet Domain5.jo
Currency6Dinar (JOD)
Telephone7+962

1. Overview

Following World War I and the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire, the UK received a mandate to govern much of the Middle East. Britain separated out a semi-autonomous region of Transjordan from Palestine in the early 1920s, and the area gained its independence in 1946; it adopted the name of The Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan in 1950. The country's long-time ruler was King HUSSEIN (1953-99). A pragmatic leader, he successfully navigated competing pressures from the major powers (US, USSR, and UK), various Arab states, Israel, and a large internal Palestinian population. Jordan lost the West Bank to Israel in the 1967 war and defeated Palestinian rebels who attempted to overthrow the monarchy in 1970. King HUSSEIN in 1988 permanently relinquished Jordanian claims to the West Bank - called "The 1988 Disengagement Decision." In 1989, he reinstituted parliamentary elections and initiated a gradual political liberalization and legalized political parties in 1992. In 1994, he signed a peace treaty with Israel. King ABDALLAH II, King HUSSEIN's eldest son, assumed the throne following his father's death in February 1999. Since then, he has consolidated his power and implemented some economic and political reforms. Jordan acceded to the World Trade Organization in 2000, and began to participate in the European Free Trade Association in 2001. In 2003, Jordan staunchly supported the Coalition ouster of SADDAM Husayn in Iraq and, following the outbreak of insurgent violence in Iraq, absorbed thousands of displaced Iraqis. Municipal elections were held in July 2007 under a system in which 20% of seats in all municipal councils were reserved by quota for women. Beginning in January 2011 in the wake of unrest in Tunisia and Egypt, as many as several thousand Jordanians staged weekly demonstrations and marches in Amman and other cities throughout Jordan to push for political reforms and to protest against government corruption, rising prices, rampant poverty, and high unemployment. In response, King ABDALLAH replaced his prime minister four times and formed two commissions - one to propose specific reforms to Jordan's electoral and political party laws and the other to consider limited constitutional amendments. In a televised speech in June 2011, King ABDULLAH announced plans to work toward transferring authority for appointing future prime ministers and cabinet ministers to parliament; in a subsequent announcement, he outlined a revised political parties law intended to encourage greater political participation. Protesters and opposition elements generally acknowledged those measures as steps in the right direction, but many continue to push for greater limits on the king's authority and to fight against government corruption. A royal decree issued in September 2011 approved constitutional amendments passed by the parliament aimed at strengthening a more independent judiciary and established a constitutional court and independent election commission to oversee municipal and parliamentary elections. In October 2011, King ABDALLAH dismissed the Jordanian cabinet and replaced the prime minister in response to widespread public dissatisfaction with government performance and escalating criticism of the premier because of public concerns over his reported involvement in corruption. Parliamentary elections held in January 2013 were overseen by the newly established Independent Electoral Commission and resulted in the election of 150 members to the Lower House of Parliament.

CIA's The World Factbook (2013)8

2. Jordan National and Social Development

UN's Human Development Index
Country2012
score
Average
1980-2010
1Norway95.587.3
2Australia93.888.9
3USA93.787.8
...
97Dominican Rep.70.260.9
98Fiji70.263.6
99Belize70.265.9
100Jordan70.061.9
101China69.954.1
102Turkmenistan69.868.1
103Thailand69.058.9
104Maldives68.861.7
105Suriname68.467.7
106Gabon68.360.4
107El Salvador68.057.0
108Mongolia67.558.1
109Bolivia67.558.5
Data Source
Social and Moral Development
CountryScore
1Sweden88.9
2Iceland87.4
3Denmark87.2
...
108Azerbaijan53.9
109Venezuela53.8
110Kuwait53.3
111Jordan53.3
112Botswana53.2
113Sao Tome & Principe53.2
114Namibia53.1
115Micronesia53.0
116Timor-Leste (E. Timor)53.0
117Samoa53.0
118Sri Lanka52.9
119Turkmenistan52.8
120Moldova52.8
121Oman52.1
Data Source

The United Nations produces an annual Human Development Report which includes the Human Development Index. The factors taken into account include life expectancy, education and schooling and Gross National Income (GNI) amongst many others. The values in the chart are factored by 100.

The Social and Moral Development Index is a formulaic aggregation of many factors. It concentrates on moral issues and human rights, violence, equality, tolerance, freedom and effectiveness in climate change mitigation and environmentalism. A country scores higher for achieving well in those areas, and for sustaining that achievement in the long term. Those countries towards the top of this index can truly said to be setting good examples and leading humankind onwards into a bright, humane, and free future. See: "What is the Best Country in the World? An Index of Morality, Conscience and Good Life" by Vexen Crabtree (2017).

3. Population and Life Expectancy

Life Expectancy (at birth)
1Japan83.6
2Hong Kong83
3Switzerland82.5
...
84Seychelles73.8
85Brazil73.8
86China73.7
87Jordan73.5
88Dominican Rep.73.6
89Mauritius73.5
90Bulgaria73.6
91Latvia73.6
Data Source
Fertility Rate
1Korea, N.2.0
2Brunei2.0
3St Vincent & Grenadines2.0
...
117Paraguay2.9
118Hong Kong1.1
119Israel2.9
120Jordan2.9
121Honduras3.0
122Philippines3.1
123Lesotho3.1
124Namibia3.1
Data Source
Population (m=millions)
CountryPeoplePer km2
1China1 353.6m145
2India1 258.35m423
3USA 315.79m35
...
101Tajikistan7.079m51
102Paraguay6.683m17
103Libya6.469m4
104Jordan6.457m73
105Laos6.374m28
106Togo6.283m116
107El Salvador6.264m302
Data Source

Jordan's population is predicted to rise to 8.415 million by 2030. This country has a fertility rate of 2.93.

The fertility rate is, in simple terms, the average amount of children that each woman has. The higher the figure, the quicker the population is growing, although, to calculate the rate you also need to take into account morbidity, i.e., the rate at which people die. If people live healthy and long lives and morbidity is low, then, 2.0 approximates to the replacement rate, which would keep the population stable. If all countries had such a fertility rate, population growth would end. The actual replacement rate in most developed countries is around 2.1.

4. Gender Equality

Female Vote and Stand
1New Zealand1893
2Australia1902
3Finland1906
...
161Andorra1973
162San Marino1973
163Bahrain1973
164Jordan1974
165Solomon Islands1974
166Sao Tome & Principe1975
167Cape Verde1975
168Angola1975
Gender Equality
1Netherlands0.04
2Sweden0.05
3Denmark0.06
...
96Cambodia0.47
97Bolivia0.47
98Burundi0.48
99Jordan0.48
100Honduras0.48
101Laos0.48
102Botswana0.49
103Nepal0.49
Data Source

Gender inequality is not a necessary part of early human development. Although a separation of roles is almost universal due to different strengths between the genders, this does not have to mean that women are subdued, and, such patriarchialism is not universal in ancient history. Those cultures and peoples who shed, or never developed, the idea that mankind ought to dominate womankind, are better cultures and peoples than those who, even today, cling violently to those mores.

Jordan is an unequal country, with male rights dominating those of women.

See:

5. Religion and Beliefs

#buddhism #christianity #hinduism #islam #judaism

Disbelief In God
1Vietnam81%
2Japan65%
3Sweden64%
...
111Liberia0%
112Kenya0%
113Niger0%
114Jordan0%
115Malawi0%
116Malaysia0%
117Mali0%
118Mauritania0%
Data Source

Data from the Pew Forum, a professional polling outfit, states that in 2010 the religious makeup of this country was as follows in the table below9:

Christian2.2%
Muslim97.2%
Hindu0.1%
Buddhist0.4%
Folk Religion0.1%
Jew0.1%
Unaffiliated0.1%

The CIA World Factbook has slightly different data, and states: Sunni Muslim 92% (official), Christian 6% (majority Greek Orthodox, but some Greek and Roman Catholics, Syrian Orthodox, Coptic Orthodox, Armenian Orthodox, and Protestant denominations), other 2% (several small Shia Muslim and Druze populations) (2001 est.)10.

The International Humanist and Ethical Union produced a report in 2012 entitled "Freedom of Thought" (2012), in which they document bias and prejudice at the national level that is based on religion, belief and/or lack of belief. Their entry for Jordan states:

The Constitution, in Article 14, provides for the freedom to practice the rites of one's religion and faith in accordance with the customs that are observed in the Kingdom, unless they violate public order or morality. According to the Constitution, the state religion is Islam and the King must be Muslim. The Constitution, in Articles 103-106, also provides that matters concerning the personal status of Muslims are under the exclusive jurisdiction of Sharia courts which apply Sharia in their proceedings. Personal status, or "family law", includes religion, marriage, divorce, child custody, and inheritance. Personal status law follows the guidelines of the Hanafi school of Islamic jurisprudence, which is applied in cases that are not explicitly addressed by civil status legislation. Matters of personal status of non-Muslims whose religion is recognized by the Government are under the jurisdiction of Tribunals of Religious Communities, according to Article 108.

The Government prohibits conversion from Islam and efforts to proselytize Muslims. The Jordanian Penal Code makes insulting Islam, the Prophet Muhammad, or any Muslim's feelings, a crime punishable by up to three years in prison. Atheists must associate themselves with a recognized religion for purposes of official identification. Employment applications for government positions occasionally contain questions about an applicant's religion.

"Freedom of Thought" by IHEU (2012)11

Links:

6. The Internet

Internet Freedom
1Estonia10
2USA12
3Germany15
...
21Indonesia42
22Malaysia43
23Libya43
24Jordan45
25Tunisia46
26Turkey46
27Venezuela48
28Azerbaijan50
Data Source
Internet Users in Population
1Iceland95.64
2Norway93.28
3Netherlands90.70
...
72Romania40.02
73Turkey39.82
74Dominican Rep.39.53
75Jordan38.88
76Kuwait38.26
77Tunisia36.56
78Colombia36.50
79Costa Rica36.50
Data Source

Internet access has become an essential research tool. It facilitates an endless list of life improvements, from the ability to network and socialize without constraint, to access to a seemingly infinite repository of technical and procedural information on pretty much any task. The universal availability of data has sped up industrial development and personal learning at the national and personal level. Individuals can read any topic they wish regardless of the locality of expert teachers, and, entire nations can develop their technology and understanding of the world simply because they are now exposed to advanced societies and moral discourses online. Like every communications medium, the Internet has issues and causes a small range of problems, but these are insignificant compared to the advantages of having an online populace.

Links:

7. More Charts and Comparisons to Other Countries

Personal Charitability (2013-2016)12
CountryValue12
1Myanmar (Burma)1.25
2USA1.5
3New Zealand3.5
...
115Latvia101.25
116El Salvador101.25
117Mauritania101.25
118Jordan102
119Japan102
120Hungary102
121Azerbaijan102.25
122Estonia103.25
Economic Freedom
1Hong Kong9.0
2Singapore8.8
3New Zealand8.4
...
19Japan7.7
20Cyprus7.7
21Oman7.7
22Jordan7.7
23Kuwait7.6
24Norway7.6
25Austria7.6
26Peru7.6
Data Source
Global Peace Index
1Iceland1.11
2New Zealand1.24
3Denmark1.24
...
59Oman1.89
60Malawi1.89
61Panama1.90
62Jordan1.90
63Indonesia1.91
64Serbia1.92
65Bosnia & Herzegovina1.92
66Moldova1.93
Data Source
Average IQ
1Singapore108
2Korea, S.106
3Taiwan105
...
79Iran84
80Pakistan84
81UAE84
82Jordan84
83Morocco84
84Afghanistan84
85Tunisia83
86Syria83
Data Source
Human Rights Treaties
1Argentina24
2Ecuador23
3Germany23
...
120Cameroon14
121Jamaica14
122Japan14
123Jordan14
124Kenya14
125Mauritania13
126Sri Lanka13
127Nepal13
Data Source
Press Freedom Index
1Finland99.0
2Netherlands99.0
3Norway99.0
...
130Libya99.4
131Burundi99.4
132Zimbabwe99.4
133Jordan99.4
134Thailand99.4
135Morocco99.4
136Ethiopia99.4
137Tunisia99.4
Data Source
R & D Spending
Country% RDP PPP
1Korea, S.4.2913
2Israel4.1113
3Japan3.5813
...
64Costa Rica0.4714
65Macedonia0.4415
66Puerto Rico0.4415
67Jordan0.4316
68Mozambique0.4217
69Thailand0.3914
70Chile0.3813
71Montenegro0.3815
Gross National Income
1Qatar$87 478
2Liechtenstein$84 880
3Kuwait$52 793
...
105Timor-Leste (E. Timor)$5 446
106Egypt$5 401
107Belize$5 327
108Jordan$5 272
109Bhutan$5 246
110Sri Lanka$5 170
111Swaziland$5 104
112Georgia$5 005
Data Source
Happiness
1Denmark7.8
2Netherlands7.6
3Norway7.6
...
55Paraguay5.8
56Bolivia5.8
57Turkmenistan5.8
58Jordan5.7
59Nicaragua5.7
60Peru5.6
61Croatia5.6
62Poland5.6
Data Source
Environmental Performance
1Iceland93.5
2Switzerland89.1
3Costa Rica86.4
...
93Korea, S.57.0
94Gabon56.4
95Cyprus56.3
96Jordan56.1
97Bosnia & Herzegovina55.9
98Saudi Arabia55.3
99Eritrea54.6
100Swaziland54.4
Data Source
Gay Equality
1Netherlands405
2Belgium350
3Canada280
...
108India10
109Haiti10
110Vatican City10
111Jordan10
112Vanuatu10
113Montserrat10
114Congo, DR10
115Burkina Faso10
Data Source

Current edition: 2013 May 01
http://www.humantruth.info/jordan.html
Parent page: Vexing International Issues

Social Media

References: (What's this?)

Charities Aid Foundation
World Giving Index. On www.cafonline.org.

CIA
(2013) World Factbook. The USA Government's Central Intelligence Agency (USA CIA) publishes The World Factbook, and the online version is frequently updated.

Crabtree, Vexen
(2017) "What is the Best Country in the World? An Index of Morality, Conscience and Good Life" (2017). Accessed 2017 Feb 20.

IHEU. International Humanist and Ethical Union.
(2012) Freedom of Thought. A copy can be found on iheu.org/...Freedom of Thought 2012.pdf, accessed 2013 Oct 28.

Lynn, Harvey & Nyborg
(2009) Average intelligence predicts atheism rates across 137 nations. Richard Lynn, John Harvey and Helmuth Nyborg article "Average intelligence predicts atheism rates across 137 nations" in Intelligence (2009 Jan/Feb) vol. 37 issue 1 pages 11-15. Online at www.sciencedirect.com, accessed 2009 Sep 15.

OECD
(2016) Research and development (R&D) - Gross domestic spending on R&D. Data from data.oecd.org. Accessed 2016 Sep 28.

United Nations
(2011) Human Development Report. This edition had the theme of Sustainability and Equity: A Better Future for All. Published on the United Nation's website at hdr.undp.org/.../HDR_2011_EN_Complete.pdf (accessed throughout 2013, Jan-Mar). UN Development Program: About the Human Development Index.
(2013) Human Development Report. This edition had the theme of The Rise of the South: Human Progress in a Diverse World. Published on the United Nation's HDR website at hdr.undp.org/.../hdr2013/ (accessed throughout 2013). UN Development Program: About the Human Development Index.

World Bank
Research and Development and a Percent of GDP PPP. Data from databank.worldbank.org. Accessed 2016 Sep 29.

Footnotes

  1. World Bank data on data.worldbank.org accessed 2013 Nov 04.^
  2. UN (2011) .^
  3. UN (2013) .^
  4. International Standards Organisation (ISO) standard ISO3166-1, on www.iso.org, accessed 2013 May 01.^
  5. Top level domains (TLDs) are managed by the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) on www.iana.org.^
  6. According to ISO4217.^
  7. According to ITU-T.^
  8. CIA (2013) https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/jo.html accessed 2014 Apr 27.^
  9. Pew Forum (2012) publication "The Global Religious Landscape: A Report on the Size and Distribution of the World´s Major Religious Groups as of 2010" (2012 Dec 18) accessed 2013 May 01.^
  10. CIA (2013) https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/ar.html accessed 2014 Apr 27.^
  11. IHEU (2012) . Added to this page on 2013 Oct 28.^
  12. Charities Aid Foundation . Average ranking across years 2013-2016. Lower is better.^
  13. OECD (2016) data for year 2014.^
  14. World Bank data for year 2011.^
  15. World Bank data for year 2013.^
  16. World Bank data for year 2008.^
  17. World Bank data for year 2010.^

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