The Human Truth Foundation

Malaysia

By Vexen Crabtree 2013

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#Malaysia

Malaysia
StatusIndependent State
Social and Moral Index95th best
CapitalKuala Lumpur (legislative/judical) and Putrajaya (administrative)
Land Area1 328 550 km2
LocationAsia
Population2 29.32 million
Life Expectancy374.455yrs (2012)
GNI3$13 676
ISO3166-1 Codes4MY, MYS, 458
Internet Domain5.my
Currency6Ringgit (MYR)
Telephone7+60

1. Overview

During the late 18th and 19th centuries, Great Britain established colonies and protectorates in the area of current Malaysia; these were occupied by Japan from 1942 to 1945. In 1948, the British-ruled territories on the Malay Peninsula except Singapore formed the Federation of Malaya, which became independent in 1957. Malaysia was formed in 1963 when the former British colonies of Singapore, as well as Sabah and Sarawak on the northern coast of Borneo, joined the Federation. The first several years of the country's independence were marred by a Communist insurgency, Indonesian confrontation with Malaysia, Philippine claims to Sabah, and Singapore's withdrawal in 1965. During the 22-year term of Prime Minister MAHATHIR bin Mohamad (1981-2003), Malaysia was successful in diversifying its economy from dependence on exports of raw materials to the development of manufacturing, services, and tourism. Prime Minister Mohamed NAJIB bin Abdul Razak (in office since April 2009) has continued these pro-business policies and has introduced some civil reforms.

CIA's The World Factbook (2013)8

2. Malaysia National and Social Development

UN's Human Development Index
Country2012
score
Average
1980-2010
1Norway95.587.3
2Australia93.888.9
3USA93.787.8
...
63Grenada77.074.6
64Serbia76.974.2
65Libya76.977.0
66Malaysia76.966.3
67Trinidad & Tobago76.070.2
68Antigua & Barbuda76.076.3
69Kazakhstan75.469.8
70Albania74.969.5
71Venezuela74.866.0
72St Kitts & Nevis74.573.5
73Lebanon74.573.7
74Dominica74.571.1
75Georgia74.572.9
Data Source
Social and Moral Development
CountryScore
1Sweden89.9
2Iceland88.7
3Denmark88.3
...
92Armenia54.9
93Guatemala54.8
94Colombia54.6
95Malaysia54.4
96Venezuela54.0
97Uzbekistan53.9
98Turkey53.8
99Russia53.7
100Kazakhstan53.5
101Namibia53.4
102Sao Tome & Principe53.2
103Thailand53.0
104Micronesia53.0
105Samoa53.0
Data Source

The United Nations produces an annual Human Development Report which includes the Human Development Index. The factors taken into account include life expectancy, education and schooling and Gross National Income (GNI) amongst many others. The values in the chart are factored by 100.

The Social and Moral Development Index is a formulaic aggregation of many factors. It concentrates on moral issues and human rights, violence, equality, tolerance, freedom and effectiveness in climate change mitigation and environmentalism. A country scores higher for achieving well in those areas, and for sustaining that achievement in the long term. Those countries towards the top of this index can truly said to be setting good examples and leading humankind onwards into a bright, humane, and free future. See: "What is the Best Country in the World? An Index of Morality, Conscience and Good Life" by Vexen Crabtree (2017).

3. Population and Life Expectancy

Life Expectancy (at birth)
1Japan83.6
2Hong Kong83
3Switzerland82.5
...
71Hungary74.6
72Venezuela74.6
73Armenia74.4
74Malaysia74.5
75Cape Verde74.3
76Thailand74.3
77Nicaragua74.3
78Peru74.2
Data Source
Fertility Rate
1Korea, N.2.0
2Brunei2.0
3St Vincent & Grenadines2.0
...
93India2.6
94Germany1.4
95Laos2.6
96Malaysia2.6
97Hungary1.4
98Romania1.4
99Japan1.4
100Poland1.4
Data Source
Population (m=millions)
CountryPeoplePer km2
1China1 353.6m145
2India1 258.35m423
3USA 315.79m35
...
41Nepal 31.01m216
42Venezuela 29.89m34
43Peru 29.73m23
44Malaysia 29.32m89
45Saudi Arabia 28.71m13
46Uzbekistan 28.08m66
47Yemen 25.57m48
Data Source

Malaysia's population is predicted to rise to 37.27 million by 2030. These millions of extra people will all need space to live, food to eat, energy to consume, and will increase the burden on the planet's resources. This country has a fertility rate of 2.58.

The fertility rate is, in simple terms, the average amount of children that each woman has. The higher the figure, the quicker the population is growing, although, to calculate the rate you also need to take into account morbidity, i.e., the rate at which people die. If people live healthy and long lives and morbidity is low, then, 2.0 approximates to the replacement rate, which would keep the population stable. If all countries had such a fertility rate, population growth would end. The actual replacement rate in most developed countries is around 2.1.

4. Gender Equality

Female Vote and Stand
1New Zealand1893
2Australia1902
3Finland1906
...
112Gabon1956
113Egypt1956
114Comoros1956
115Malaysia1957
116Burkina Faso1958
117Guinea1958
118Nigeria1958
119Chad1958
Gender Equality
1Netherlands0.04
2Sweden0.05
3Denmark0.06
...
39Malta0.24
40UAE0.24
41Albania0.25
42Malaysia0.26
43Hungary0.26
44USA0.26
45Bahrain0.26
46Tunisia0.26
Data Source

Gender inequality is not a necessary part of early human development. Although a separation of roles is almost universal due to different strengths between the genders, this does not have to mean that women are subdued, and, such patriarchialism is not universal in ancient history. Those cultures and peoples who shed, or never developed, the idea that mankind ought to dominate womankind, are better cultures and peoples than those who, even today, cling violently to those mores.

The 1950s saw a late rush of 43 countries, including Malaysia and many developing nations, move to cease preventing women from voting. Malaysia is on the way towards ending gender inequality but women are still in an unfavourable position much of the time.

See:

5. Religion and Beliefs

#buddhism #christianity #hinduism #islam #judaism

Disbelief In God
1Vietnam81%
2Japan65%
3Sweden64%
...
113Niger0%
114Jordan0%
115Malawi0%
116Malaysia0%
117Mali0%
118Mauritania0%
119Nepal0%
120Morocco0%
Data Source
How Many Are Religious?
1Estonia16%
2Sweden17%
3Denmark19%
...
96Philippines96%
97Cambodia96%
98Cameroon96%
99Malaysia96%
100Afghanistan97%
101Thailand97%
102Comoros97%
103Morocco97%
Data Source

Data from the Pew Forum, a professional polling outfit, states that in 2010 the religious makeup of this country was as follows in the table below9:

Christian9.4%
Muslim63.7%
Hindu6%
Buddhist17.7%
Folk Religion2.3%
Jew0.1%
Unaffiliated0.7%

The CIA World Factbook has slightly different data, and states: Muslim (or Islam - official) 60.4%, Buddhist 19.2%, Christian 9.1%, Hindu 6.3%, Confucianism, Taoism, other traditional Chinese religions 2.6%, other or unknown 1.5%, none 0.8% (2000 census)10.

Malaysia has a particular problem when it comes to human rights surrounding freedom of belief, especially when it comes to issues surrounding Islam. The following case illustrates the depth of the problems:

Book CoverA few years ago, Lina Joy, a Malaysian who had been born a Muslim, started proceedings in civil court to obtain the right to marry her Christian fiancé and have children. She maintained that she had converted from Islam to Christianity and, consequently, did not need the permission of the Islamic sharia courts that typically governed such matters for Muslims in Malaysia. The lower civil courts ruled against her, and ultimately she brought the case to the nation's highest court, which - in May 2007 - rejected her appeal. Thus, her official identity card still designates her religion as Muslim. The high court ruled that one cannot, at one's whim and fancy, renounce a religion. Lina Joy continues to endure many death threats from Muslims who consider her an apostate and she lives in hiding. Malik Imtiaz Sarwar, a Muslim human rights lawyer who helped with her case, has received one death threat that was widely circulated by e-mail. This e-mail featured his picture, with the heading "Wanted Dead" and the text "This is the face of the traitorous lawyer to Islam who supports the Lina Joy apostasy case."

"Bad Faith: The Danger of Religious Extremism" by Neil J. Kressel (2007)11

The International Humanist and Ethical Union produced a report in 2012 entitled "Freedom of Thought" (2012), in which they document bias and prejudice at the national level that is based on religion, belief and/or lack of belief. Their entry for Malaysia states:

The constitution protects freedom of religion or belief. However, portions of the constitution as well as other laws and policies restrict this freedom. Prosecutions for blasphemy usually target those who offend Islam, but an insult to any religion can give rise to prosecution. Every Malaysian citizen over the age of 12 must carry an identification card, a 'MyKad', which must state the bearer's religion. This requirement alone appears to breach the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPT) under which States have no right to demand to know the religion of any of their citizens; a point reinforced by Section 3 of General Comment 22 of the Human Rights Committee: 'In accordance with articles 18.2 and 17, no one can be compelled to reveal his thoughts or adherence to a religion or belief.' But, in addition, the government has a history of limiting how citizens can identify their religion.12

The constitution defines ethnic Malays as Muslim. Authorities at the state level administer Sharia laws through Islamic courts and have jurisdiction over all Muslims. Sharia laws and the degree of their enforcement vary by state. State governments impose Sharia law on Muslims in some cultural and social matters but generally do not interfere with the religious practices of non-Muslim communities; however, debates continued regarding incorporating elements of Sharia law, such as khalwat (being in close physical proximity with an unrelated member of the opposite sex), into secular civil and criminal law. Although specific punishments for violation of khalwat vary from state to state, it is typically punishable by some combination of imprisonment up to two years, a fine of RM 3,000 ($940)13, or several strokes of the cane.

Amending the penal code is the exclusive prerogative of the federal government. Despite contradicting federal law, the state governments of Kelantan and Terengganu passed laws in 1993 and 2002, respectively, making apostasy a capital offense. Apostasy is defined as the conversion from Islam to another faith. No one has been convicted under these laws and, according to a 1993 statement by the Attorney General, the laws cannot be enforced absent a constitutional amendment. Nationally, Muslims who seek to convert to another religion must first obtain approval from a Sharia court to declare themselves "apostates." This effectively prohibits the conversion of Muslims, since Sharia courts seldom grant such requests and can impose penalties (such as enforced "rehabilitation") on apostates. Additionally, Articles 295-298A of the penal code allow up to three years in prison and a US $1,000 fine penalties for those who "commit offenses against religion", which covers "blasphemous" statements, usually against Islam.

"Freedom of Thought" by IHEU (2012)14

Links:

6. The Internet

Internet Freedom
1Estonia10
2USA12
3Germany15
...
19Mexico37
20India39
21Indonesia42
22Malaysia43
23Libya43
24Jordan45
25Tunisia46
26Turkey46
Data Source
IT Security Risks
271USA3.68
270Russia2.42
269India2.10
...
235Brazil1.02
234Tajikistan1.01
233Canada0.96
232Malaysia0.96
231Saudi Arabia0.94
230Kuwait0.93
229Spain0.88
228Laos0.86
Data Source
Internet Users in Population
1Iceland95.64
2Norway93.28
3Netherlands90.70
...
40Poland62.47
41Oman61.99
42Croatia60.12
43Malaysia56.30
44Bahrain54.99
45Italy53.74
46Cyprus53.02
47Bosnia & Herzegovina52.00
Data Source

Internet access has become an essential research tool. It facilitates an endless list of life improvements, from the ability to network and socialize without constraint, to access to a seemingly infinite repository of technical and procedural information on pretty much any task. The universal availability of data has sped up industrial development and personal learning at the national and personal level. Individuals can read any topic they wish regardless of the locality of expert teachers, and, entire nations can develop their technology and understanding of the world simply because they are now exposed to advanced societies and moral discourses online. Like every communications medium, the Internet has issues and causes a small range of problems, but these are insignificant compared to the advantages of having an online populace.

Links:

7. More Charts and Comparisons to Other Countries

Anti-Semite Opinions15
Country%15
1Laos0
2Philippines3
3Sweden4
...
81Korea, S.53
82Iran56
83Armenia58
84Malaysia61
85Turkey69
86Greece69
87Saudi Arabia74
88Egypt75
Personal Charitability
(World Position, 2013-2016)
16
CountryValue16
1Myanmar (Burma)1.25
2USA1.5
3New Zealand3.5
...
25Switzerland25
26Guatemala25
27Denmark25.5
28Malaysia27.5
29Finland28.25
30Thailand28.75
31Uzbekistan29
32Libya29
Personal, Civil and Economic Freedom17
CountryRank17
1Hong Kong1
2Switzerland2
3New Zealand3
...
113Senegal111
114Colombia111
115Russia115
116Malaysia115
117Qatar117
118Guinea-Bissau118
119UAE118
120Timor-Leste (E. Timor)120
Global Peace Index
1Iceland1.11
2New Zealand1.24
3Denmark1.24
...
17Hungary1.48
18Norway1.48
19Bhutan1.48
20Malaysia1.49
21Mauritius1.49
22Australia1.49
23Singapore1.52
24Poland1.52
Data Source
Average IQ
1Singapore108
2Korea, S.106
3Taiwan105
...
44Bulgaria93
45Argentina93
46Ireland92
47Malaysia92
48Greece92
49Cambodia91
50Thailand91
51Lithuania91
Data Source
Human Rights Treaties
1Argentina24
2Ecuador23
3Germany23
...
186Micronesia5
187Nauru5
188Singapore5
189Malaysia4
190Marshall Islands4
191Palau4
192Myanmar (Burma)4
193Bhutan3
Data Source
Press Freedom Index
1Finland99.0
2Netherlands99.0
3Norway99.0
...
141Congo, DR99.4
142Cambodia99.5
143Bangladesh99.5
144Malaysia99.5
145Palestine99.5
146Philippines99.5
147Russia99.5
148Singapore99.5
Data Source
R & D Spending
Country% RDP PPP
1Korea, S.4.2918
2Israel4.1118
3Japan3.5818
...
30Russia1.1918
31New Zealand1.1719
32Brazil1.1520
33Malaysia1.1320
34Turkey1.0118
35Lithuania0.9521
36Poland0.9418
37Slovakia0.8918
Gross National Income
1Qatar$87 478
2Liechtenstein$84 880
3Kuwait$52 793
...
56Antigua & Barbuda$13 883
57Libya$13 765
58Turkey$13 710
59Malaysia$13 676
60Panama$13 519
61Belarus$13 385
62Uruguay$13 333
63Mauritius$13 300
Data Source
Happiness
1Denmark7.8
2Netherlands7.6
3Norway7.6
...
49Slovakia5.9
50Honduras5.9
51Ecuador5.8
52Malaysia5.8
53Moldova5.8
54Vietnam5.8
55Paraguay5.8
56Bolivia5.8
Data Source
Environmental Performance
1Iceland93.5
2Switzerland89.1
3Costa Rica86.4
...
50Australia65.7
51Morocco65.6
52Belarus65.4
53Malaysia65.0
54Slovenia65.0
55Syria64.6
56Estonia63.8
57Sri Lanka63.7
Data Source
Gay Equality
1Netherlands405
2Belgium350
3Canada280
...
200Malawi-220
201Mauritania-220
202Nigeria-220
203Malaysia-220
204Tanzania-220
205Somaliland-500
206Saudi Arabia-520
207Sudan-520
Data Source

Current edition: 2013 May 01
Last Modified: 2015 Oct 26
http://www.humantruth.info/malaysia.html
Parent page: The Human Truth Foundation

Social Media

References: (What's this?)

Anti-Defamation League. (ADL)
(2014) ADL Global 100, Executive Summary. Accessed on global100.adl.org on 2017 Jan 02. The numbers given are of those who state that racist stereotyped statements about Jews are true; they have to agree to 6 or more of the 11 statements to be counted. An example statements is "Jews are hated because of the way they behave". The data was collected from 53,100 interviews across 101 countries plus the West Bank and Gaza. The global average is 26%.

Charities Aid Foundation
World Giving Index. On www.cafonline.org.

CIA
(2013) World Factbook. The USA Government's Central Intelligence Agency (USA CIA) publishes The World Factbook, and the online version is frequently updated.

Crabtree, Vexen
(2017) "What is the Best Country in the World? An Index of Morality, Conscience and Good Life" (2017). Accessed 2017 Feb 28.

Gallup
(2009) Religiosity. gallup.com/poll/142727/.... The survey question was "Is religion an important part of your daily life?" and results are charted for those who said "yes". 1000 adults were polled in each of 114 countries.

IHEU. International Humanist and Ethical Union.
(2012) Freedom of Thought. A copy can be found on iheu.org/...Freedom of Thought 2012.pdf, accessed 2013 Oct 28.

Kressel, Neil
(2007) Bad Faith: The Danger of Religious Extremism. E-book. Amazon Kindle digital edition. Published by Prometheus Books, New York, USA.

Lynn, Harvey & Nyborg
(2009) Average intelligence predicts atheism rates across 137 nations. Richard Lynn, John Harvey and Helmuth Nyborg article "Average intelligence predicts atheism rates across 137 nations" in Intelligence (2009 Jan/Feb) vol. 37 issue 1 pages 11-15. Online at www.sciencedirect.com, accessed 2009 Sep 15.

OECD
(2016) Research and development (R&D) - Gross domestic spending on R&D. Data from data.oecd.org. Accessed 2016 Sep 28.

The Fraser Institute
(2016) The Human Freedom Index. Published by The Cato Institute, The Fraser Institute and the Friedrich Naumann Foundation for Freedom. Covers data up to 2014. On www.fraserinstitute.org/.../human-freedom-index-2016..

United Nations
(2011) Human Development Report. This edition had the theme of Sustainability and Equity: A Better Future for All. Published on the United Nation's website at hdr.undp.org/.../HDR_2011_EN_Complete.pdf (accessed throughout 2013, Jan-Mar). UN Development Program: About the Human Development Index.
(2013) Human Development Report. This edition had the theme of The Rise of the South: Human Progress in a Diverse World. Published on the United Nation's HDR website at hdr.undp.org/.../hdr2013/ (accessed throughout 2013). UN Development Program: About the Human Development Index.

World Bank
Research and Development and a Percent of GDP PPP. Data from databank.worldbank.org. Accessed 2016 Sep 29.

Footnotes

  1. World Bank data on data.worldbank.org accessed 2013 Nov 04.^
  2. UN (2011) .^
  3. UN (2013) .^
  4. International Standards Organisation (ISO) standard ISO3166-1, on www.iso.org, accessed 2013 May 01.^
  5. Top level domains (TLDs) are managed by the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) on www.iana.org.^
  6. According to ISO4217.^
  7. According to ITU-T.^
  8. CIA (2013) https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/my.html accessed 2014 Apr 27.^
  9. Pew Forum (2012) publication "The Global Religious Landscape: A Report on the Size and Distribution of the World´s Major Religious Groups as of 2010" (2012 Dec 18) accessed 2013 May 01.^
  10. CIA (2013) https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/ar.html accessed 2014 Apr 27.^
  11. Kressel (2007) chapter 4 "Dangerous Books?" digital location 2157-2163. Added to this page on 2015 Oct 26.^
  12. 2010 IRF report (US International Religious Freedom report). In IHEU 2012.^
  13. freedomhouse.org/.../malaysia. In IHEU 2012.^
  14. IHEU (2012) . Added to this page on 2013 Oct 28.^
  15. ADL (2014) . Lower is better.^
  16. Charities Aid Foundation . Average ranking across years 2013-2016. Lower is better.^
  17. Fraser Institute, the (2016) . Covers data for 2014.^
  18. OECD (2016) data for year 2014.^
  19. OECD (2016) data for year 2013.^
  20. World Bank data for year 2012.^
  21. World Bank data for year 2013.^

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